Little Ax students travel to OKC Memorial to keep memory alive

Dozens of students from Little Ax traveled to the Oklahoma City Memorial on Tuesday to remember the past and keep memories alive. People from all walks of life made their way to the memorial on the 27th anniversary of the bombing, including those students. None of them were alive in 1995 but they wanted to make sure the victims aren’t forgotten.One by one, students filed into the memorial. All of them focused on their teacher, who read the names of each of the 168 victims.The teacher told his students he wanted them to make an impact with their hearts. They looked for the name of the victim they chose, with flowers and a personal note in hand. “I believe Derwin Miller was a great man,” said Brodi Jachson Mahoney. Mystery Roulston chose 1-year-old Tevin Garret. “He seemed a lot like me cause I enjoy dancing and I always played with my toys and Tevin, those were the things he liked,” Roulston said.A few chairs down, next to Norma Jean Johnson’s chair, Norma’s daughter Oneta read a note left by a student.She shared one last embrace with the eighth-grade student who made sure Norma Jean Johnson will always be remembered.The students had a note and flowers for all 168 victims, making sure no one was left out.

Dozens of students from Little Ax traveled to the Oklahoma City Memorial on Tuesday to remember the past and keep memories alive.

People from all walks of life made their way to the memorial on the 27th anniversary of the bombing, including those students. None of them were alive in 1995 but they wanted to make sure the victims are not forgotten.

One by one, students filed into the memorial. All of them focused on their teacher, who read the names of each of the 168 victims.

The teacher told his students he wanted them to make an impact with their hearts. They looked for the name of the victim they chose, with flowers and a personal note in hand.

“I believe Derwin Miller was a great man,” said Brodi Jachson Mahoney.

Mystery Roulston chose 1-year-old Tevin Garret.

“He seemed a lot like me cause I enjoy dancing and I always played with my toys and Tevin, those were the things he liked,” Roulston said.

A few chairs down, next to Norma Jean Johnson’s chair, Norma’s daughter Oneta read a note left by a student.

She shared one last embrace with the eighth-grade student who made sure Norma Jean Johnson will always be remembered.

The students had a note and flowers for all 168 victims, making sure no one was left out.

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